NOTICE: CLUES services are temporarily being offered online or via telephone only due to COVID-19. LEARN MORE

COVID-19

CLUES COVID-19 Hotline: 651-768-0000

At CLUES, the health, safety and wellbeing of our staff, program participants, volunteers and community partners is of the utmost importance. We are monitoring the developing COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation and are taking necessary precautions to minimize the exposure and spread of the disease to our staff, volunteers and the communities we serve. Learn more below about COVID-19, how CLUES programs and services are affected, and what additional community resources are available.

CLUES Programs and Facilities

Due to the severity of the COVID-19 health crisis, CLUES offices are temporarily closed to the public to reduce person-to-person contact. We apologize for any inconvenience.

During this time, CLUES programs and services are available via phone-based and video conferencing services. More information is available below.

We have established a hotline at 651-768-0000 where people can call or text to receive information for services available including online resources, CLUES programs and services, and other additional community resources. In addition, how to find a COVID-19 testing location and other actions to help slow the spread of COVID-19. 

Staff will also be available to answer questions over the phone between the hours of 8:30 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday, at 651-379-4200 and 612-746-3500.

All adult classes and youth enrichment services have been moved to online delivery. In-person classes and drop-in spaces (Teen Tech Center and Youth Career Center) will be closed until further notice.

English Language Classes (ESL)

English Language classes at CLUES are for anyone who would like to improve their English skills. Students learn how to read, write, speak and understand the English language while also gaining essential life skills that will better prepare them to successfully navigate life in the U.S. and get better jobs.

When and where? Classes are online

  • Morning Classes: Monday-Thursday, 10 am–12 pm
  • Evening Classes: Monday-Thursday, 6-8 pm

How to register? 
Please complete the class registration form here.

Citizenship Classes

Citizenship Classes prepares students to successfully pass the United States Citizenship exam. Classes are taught in English only.

Class topics include:

  • The process of becoming a citizen
  • United States history and government
  • Interview preparation and practice
  • Study materials and other resources

When and where?

Citizenship classes are online.

  • Mondays, 6-8 pm

How to register? 

Please complete the class registration form here.

The Latino Elder Day Center will be closed until further notice. Some services are available via phone or video conferencing, including:

  • Registration assistance for Meals on Wheels
  • Digital resources such as virtual exercise instruction through teleconferencing or videos
  • Delivery or pickup of care packages to elders
  • Twice daily phone check-ins with elders

Canasta Familiar is a free food distribution program held every Monday at CLUES St. Paul and every other Wednesday at CLUES Minneapolis offices.  

Each week, Canasta Familiar receives donations that includes fresh produce (fruits and vegetables), meat and other non-perishable items. Foods vary according to availability.

Families can choose their food and select the items that are most appropriate for their home. There is a limit of one basket per family.

Read the full program guidelines here.

Winter Schedule (October-December)

Mondays, 3-6 pm
CLUES St. Paul
797 East 7th St., St. Paul MN 55106

Wednesdays, 2-5 pm  
CLUES Minneapolis
CareerForce Center
777 East Lake St. Minneapolis, MN 55407 

For information on Canasta Familiar, contact:

Janelle Calvo-Nieto
651-379-4256
JCalvo@clues.org

*NOTE: Remember that if you are sick or someone in your family is sick, do not come to Canasta. You can send someone on your behalf to pick up your food. It is important to wear a mask and keep the 6 feet away to help slow the spread of the Covid-19. 

*IMPORTANT: Baskets will be given out on first-come, first-served basis while supplies last. We will be holding a “drive-through” and can only serve people who remain in their vehicles due the risk of in-person contact/transmission. Limit one basket per vehicle. 

**Access to the drive-thru Canasta will be via Arcade Street where they will access CLUES parking lot and receive their Canasta box through the Adult Day Center side door. We will have a barricade and signs directing participants and doing the best we can to control traffic flow.

Staff have implemented telehealth approaches to provide therapy and case management via phone or video conferencing. In-person therapy and appointments are suspended, as are walk-in intake hours and all group meetings and sessions at CLUES or in school settings (including Familias Unidas program). A phone group will be available for those in addiction recovery who need continued support.

Intake for new participants can be completed by phone by calling Karina Franco, Behavioral Health Intake Specialist at 612-746-3572. We are also working to establish a crisis line – more information to be announced.

CLUES is proving video resources about Covid-19 and mindfulness around Mental Health. Watch the videos here.

Staff have transitioned services to phone and video conferencing. Employment coaches are providing services remotely, and we are working to expand capabilities to assist those affected by the COVID-19 crisis in applying for unemployment benefits.

We are also developing a series of videos to provide career preparation learning and workforce trainings remotely, as well as orientation for new MFIP clients.

Tax preparation services are suspended until further notice. Job fairs are being held virtually.

Homestretch workshops are postponed until further notice. CLUES is still able to provide housing counseling services such as foreclosure prevention and pre-purchasing counseling through virtual or phone conferencing.

SNAP enrollment assistance is available remotely via phone (call 651-379-4270).

Staff are working remotely via phone and our emergency line remains open. In-person support groups are postponed until further notice.

Community garden, in-school and in-person health programming are suspended until further notice.

We are exploring options to provide MNSure Navigator services remotely.

Census Open House Workshops on March 14, March 28, April 4 and April 11 will be transitioned to remote services – do not attend in person. During the scheduled events, staff and volunteers will be available to assist you in completing your Census forms by phone by calling 612-399-6140.

Public Charge Legal Clinic on March 31 will be postponed until further notice.

CLUES Latino Art Gallery is closed and in-person arts programming is postponed until further notice. 

All Art programs will be held online. For more information and registration, please contact us by email: arte@clues.org

About COVID-19

COVID-19 is a viral respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus that has not been found in people before. This is an infectious disease. Because this is a new virus, there are still things we don't know, but every day, we learn more about COVID-19. 

The Minnesota public health community is working hard to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our state, and we need everyone's help. Avoid assumptions about who you think may have this disease. Viruses do not discriminate.

The virus that causes COVID-19 probably emerged from an animal source, but is now spreading from person to person. 

COVID-19 is spread in three main ways: 

  • Breathing in air when close to an infected person who is exhaling small droplets and fine particles that contain the virus. 
  • Having these small droplets and particles that contain virus land on the eyes, nose, or mouth, especially through splashes and sprays like a cough or sneeze. 
  • Touching eyes, nose, or mouth with hands that have the virus on them. It is important to wash your hands before you touch your mouth, nose, face, or eyes. 

People can spread the COVID-19 disease to each other. Infected people may be able to spread the disease before they have symptoms or feel sick. A person can also spread the disease if they have no symptoms. Research has shown that around 40-50% of people infected do not develop symptoms. 

Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-covid-spreads.html

COVID-19 affects different people in different ways. Infected people have had a wide range of symptoms reported – from mild symptoms to severe illness.
 
Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:
  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Look for emergency warning signs for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:
  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face
Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Not everyone with COVID-19 has all of these symptoms, and some people may not have any symptoms. Even after recovering from COVID-19, some people may have lingering symptoms such as fatigue, cough, or joint pain. The long-term health effects are still unknown but there may be permanent damage to the heart, lungs, or other organs. This is more likely in those who had more severe illness but may also be possible even in those who had mild illness. 

 

Variants are common with a virus like COVID-19. Viruses constantly change through mutation, and new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. 

Multiple COVID-19 variants are circulating globally, and in the United States. Several of these variants have been identified and are spreading in Minnesota. 

These variants are concerning because they are more contagious. For example, early data shows that some variants spread more easily and can be as much as 50% more contagious than the original virus. Currently, the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant is the most common in Minnesota. 

New data suggest the Delta variant is different than past versions of the virus and spreads about twice as easily from one person to another. 

The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original virus. CDC expects that anyone with Omicron infection can spread the virus to others, even if they are vaccinated or don’t have symptoms.

Vaccination reduces overall spread of the virus, which makes it harder for it to change (mutate) and create variants. Vaccination also helps protect against the variants, especially severe disease. That's why it's so important for all who are eligible to get vaccinated.

Testing for variants 

COVID-19 tests do not tell you which variant you have but testing plays a key role in our efforts to contain and mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic by identifying infected individuals to help prevent further person-to-person transmission of COVID-19.

Through a process called sequencing, scientists can determine which variant causes the infection and monitor how the virus is changing. 

A percentage of people's tests — not all tests — are sent to the state's public health lab. Testing for variants takes a long time and a lot of work. It takes the lab about 42 hours to run 100 tests. We send enough tests to give us a good idea of what variants are spreading. 

We are not able to release the results of these variant tests to doctors or patients. No matter which variant you have, you'll take the same steps, like staying away from others, getting vaccinated, and wearing a mask when recommended. 

There is still to little information about the Omicron variant. The CDC will provide updates.

There are now 3 vaccines to prevent COVID-19: Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson and Johnson. The best thing you can do to prevent contracting COVID-19 is to access a free vaccine and continue to avoid exposure to this virus. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following preventive actions that should be practiced daily:

Know how it spreads

  • There are currently 3 vaccines to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). 
  • In addition to being vaccinated, the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. 
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
    • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
    • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms. These are known as “asymptomatic cases” and are less common but are a prime example of why masks should always be worn as we are not always aware if someone may be carrying the virus.

 

Everyone Should

 

Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash:
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • Before touching your face
    • After using the restroom
    • After leaving a public place
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After handling your mask
    • After changing a diaper
    • After caring for someone sick
    • After touching animals or pets
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. 

Avoid close contact

  • Inside your home: Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • If possible, maintain 6 feet between the person who is sick and other household members. It is best if the infected individual can be quarantined in a separate room of the household, but if not, try to wear masks when in close proximity.
  • Outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around others

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • The mask is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Everyone should wear a mask in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
    • Masks should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The mask is not a substitute for social distancing.

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean and disinfect

head side medical light icon

Monitor Your Health Daily

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature if symptoms develop.
    • Don’t take your temperature within 30 minutes of exercising or after taking medications that could lower your temperature, like acetaminophen.

Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Mask Mandate Update

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) recommend that people, both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated, continue to wear a well-fitted mask in some settings or situations. Other federal, state, or local laws may require masks, and businesses may set their own requirements. 

It is important to wear a mask in some settings to help limit the spread of COVID-19. Viruses constantly change and new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. New data suggests that an emerging variant, the Delta variant, is different than past versions of the virus and spreads about twice as easily from one person to another. With the Delta variant, fully vaccinated people may be able to pass the disease to others. However, the vaccines still work. Fully vaccinated people are less likely to get infected, and if a vaccinated person gets infected, the illness will likely be mild. The vaccine also greatly reduces the chance of hospitalization and death. 

Because the Delta and Omicron variant is shown to spread more easily, MDH recommends everyone, both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated, wear a mask in the following situations: 

  • If you are immunocompromised or at an increased risk for severe disease from COVID-19, consider wearing a mask regardless of the level of transmission in your area. People who are at increased risk for severe disease include older adults and those who have certain medical conditions such as diabetes, overweight or obesity, and heart conditions. Immunocompromised people, even if fully vaccinated, should talk to their health care providers for other specific recommendations. 
  • If you live or frequently interact with someone who is immunocompromised, not fully vaccinated, or at an increased risk for severe disease from COVID-19, consider wearing a mask in indoor public or crowded outdoor settings regardless of the level of transmission in your area. 
  • Where you are in settings that pose a high risk of COVID-19 spread or complications from COVID-19 infection, such as schools, health care settings, homeless shelters, and correctional facilities. 

 

More Information

Considerations for Wearing Masks
How to Wear Your Mask
How to Wash Your Mask
How to Make Your Own Mask 
ASL Video Series: Easy DIY Mask

Limiting close face-to-face contact with others is the best way to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

What is social distancing?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages everyone to stay home and avoid non-essential travel. If you must go in public for essentials, practice social distancing — that is, maintaining physical space around you — by:
  • Keeping at least 6 feet away from others.
  • Avoiding gathering in groups, including at a friend’s house, parks, restaurants, shops or any other place. If you do gather in a group, make sure to maintain social distancing and wear masks. If you have been vaccinated, please see more about separate guidelines that apply. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated.html  
  • Staying out of crowded places.

You can still stay connected while staying away. Tips include:

  • Following the directions of local authorities.
  • Using delivery services for prescriptions and groceries when possible. If you must go out, use a cloth face cover and stay 6 feet away from others.
  • Connecting virtually with loved ones through phone and video calls, texts or social media.

For more information visit the CDC's page about Social Distancing.

The new coronavirus (COVID-19) can infect people of all ages, but older people and those with some diseases (such as lung disease, diabetes, heart disease, or disease that weakens the immune system) are more likely to become seriously ill when they get the infection.

If you are living with a chronic condition, take the following steps to prevent infection:

  • Have enough food and necessary medications with you.
  • Avoid being in public or groups.
  • Avoid unnecessary travel.
  • If the virus reaches your community, stay home and do not go out.

People of all ages are advised to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example, by good hand hygiene at all times.

If you are fully vaccinated:

  • You are allowed to resume domestic travel and refrain from testing before or after travel or self-quarantine after travel. 
  • You can refrain from testing before leaving the United States for international travel (unless required by the destination) and refrain from self-quarantine after arriving back in the United States. 

During Travel you should: 

  •  Still wear a mask over your nose and mouth. Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. 
  • Avoid crowds and stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who is not traveling with you. 
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol). 

After Travel: 

  • Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms; isolate and get tested if you develop symptoms. 
  • Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements. 
  • You do NOT need to get tested or self-quarantine if you are fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 in the past 3 months. You should still follow all other travel recommendations. 

Visit the CDC page for updated travel guidance: https://bit.ly/3eEQPkN  

If you are unvaccinated:

Travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

You can get COVID-19 during your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can still spread COVID-19 to others. You and your travel companions (including children) may spread COVID-19 to other people including your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you were exposed to the virus.

Don’t travel if you are sick or if you have been around someone with COVID-19 in the past 14 days. Don’t travel with someone who is sick.

Before You Travel

Before you travel, consider the following:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading at your destination?
    The more cases at your destination, the more likely you are to get infected during travel and spread the virus to others when you return.
  • Do you live with someone who might be more likely to get very ill from COVID-19?
    If you get infected while traveling, you can spread the virus to loved ones when you return, even if you don’t have symptoms.
  • Are you more likely to get very ill from COVID-19?
    Anyone can get very ill from the virus that causes COVID-19, but older adults and people of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Does your destination have requirements or restrictions for travelers?
    Some state, local, and territorial governments have requirements, such as requiring people to wear masks and requiring those who recently traveled to stay home for up to 14 days. Check state and local public health websites for information before you travel. If you are traveling internationally, check the country’s Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information pageexternal icon for details about entry requirements and restrictions for arriving travelers, such as mandatory testing or quarantine.

If You Travel

During your trip, take steps to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when in public settings.
  • Avoid close contact by staying at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from anyone who is not from your household.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
  • Avoid contact with anyone who is sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Traveling Abroad? Check CDC’s COVID-19 Travel Recommendations by Country before planning your trip.

Now that there are authorized and recommended vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in the United StatesThe best COVID-19 vaccine is the first one that is available to you. Do not wait for a specific brand. All currently authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines: are safe, are effective, and reduce your risk of severe illness. CDC does not recommend one vaccine over another. Here are 8 things you need to know about the new COVID-19 Vaccination Program and COVID-19 vaccines via CDC. . Additionally, we recommend this article detailing the benefits of being vaccinated: https://bit.ly/3xvfrVY  

Please, note that information is constantly changing for COVID-19 vaccines. We recommend you consult the Minnesota Department of Health website to get the most recent information about COVID-19 vaccines.

The Minnesota COVID-19 Vaccine Connector helps Minnesotans find out when, where, and how to get a COVID-19 vaccine. This tool is for all Minnesotans 18 years of age and older who have not yet been vaccinated. Insurance and identification are not needed, and signing up is free. Sign up here.

Remember, the best way to prevent infection is to take everyday preventive actions, like avoiding close contact with people who are sick, washing your hands often and wearing a mask.

For more information on the vaccines, read our blog post on what you need to know about the vaccines: https://clues.org/what-do-you-need-to-know-about-the-covid-19-vaccine/  

Booster shots 

Medical researchers have been studying how long protection from the COVID-19 vaccines lasts. COVID-19 vaccines continue to work very well at reducing the risk of severe illness, hospitalization, and death, but there is newer data to suggest that protection against COVID-19 infection decreases over time. A booster shot is given when protection from the original vaccination begins to decrease. This additional dose of vaccine can help get protection back up to a higher level. Certain people are now recommended to get a booster shot of COVID-19 vaccine. Learn more under "who is eligible for a booster shot now." 

More information about booster shots 

  • Many routine vaccines require booster shots to maintain protection. For example, people are due to get a tetanus shot every 10 years. That shot is a booster shot. It “boosts” your ability to fight the disease if you are exposed, because we know original protection from the vaccine decreases over time. 
  • People who have received their initial vaccine series (two doses of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine) still have some protection even once protection starts to decrease. The booster shot helps get protection back up to a higher level. 
  • There is a recommendation for people with certain immunocompromising conditions to receive an additional dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as part of their initial vaccine series. This is different from a booster dose. People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should also get a booster dose 6 months after their third dose. Learn more under the "Immunocompromised people" section at the top of this webpage or at CDC: COVID-19 Vaccines for Moderately to Severely Immunocompromised People. 

As we learn more about COVID-19, and as we continue to track how the vaccines are working, we will continue to follow the science and update recommendations that will best protect people from the disease. 

Who is eligible for a booster shot now? 

All Minnesotans age 18 and older are recommended to get a booster shot. The timing of your booster shot depends on the vaccine you received for your initial vaccine series. 

  • If you got Johnson & Johnson vaccine: All Minnesotans age 18 and older should get a booster shot at least 2 months after their first dose. 
  • If you got Pfizer or Moderna vaccine: All Minnesotans age 18 and older should get a booster shot at least 6 months after their primary series of COVID-19 vaccine. 
  • For most people, the primary series is two doses of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, but people with certain immunocompromising conditions are recommended to get a third dose of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine as part of their primary series. Learn more under the "Doses of COVID-19 vaccine" section near the top of this webpage. 

Officials also authorized "mixing and matching" COVID-19 vaccine boosters, meaning anybody who is eligible to get a booster shot can get any of the three currently authorized or approved vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson) – regardless of what vaccine they received for their primary series. 

Talk to your health care provider about your risk, the need for a booster dose, and any questions about mixing and matching doses. 

COVID-19 vaccines are effective, especially at preventing serious illness and death. However, evidence is showing that boosters for all adults, given at the appropriate time after your primary vaccination series, can help extend the protection and keep it at a higher level. 

If you are eligible to get a booster shot, check our events in St Paul and Minneapolis.

Every Minnesotan age 5 years and older can get vaccinated.

COVID-19 vaccines help protect your child from COVID-19. They also help keep your child from spreading COVID-19 to others. Help protect your whole family by getting yourself and your children 5 years and older vaccinated against COVID-19.

At this time, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is the only COVID-19 vaccine that has been studied and authorized for use by people ages 5 years and older. Children age 5 to 11 should get the Pfizer vaccine for 5- to 11-year-olds as it is a smaller dose of vaccine than the Pfizer vaccine for people age 12 and older. Data from Pfizer vaccine studies show the vaccine is safe and effective for children and teens. Other vaccine manufacturers are also studying their vaccines in younger age groups but have not yet received authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

On Dec. 9, 2021, FDA and CDC authorized emergency use of a single booster shot for people 16 and 17 years of age at least six months after completing their primary series of Pfizer vaccine.

If you feel sick or have any symptoms of COVID-19 

Whether or not you are fully vaccinated: 

  • Get tested right away. Visit COVID-19 Testing. 
  • Stay home and away from others. Refer to the how long to stay home section below. 
  • Wear a mask if you must be around others.  
  • Wash your hands often, with soap and water. Wash for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol. 
  • Cover Your Cough: cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue. Throw used tissues in the trash. Wash your hands. 

If you test positive for COVID-19 

  • Stay home and away from others, even if you do not have symptoms.  
  • Symptoms may appear up to 14 days after you are close to someone with COVID-19 (exposed). 
  • You can spread COVID-19 to others a couple days before you have any symptoms, or even if you never have any symptoms of COVID-19. 
  • If you have been fully vaccinated and test positive for COVID-19, you still need to stay home and away from others.  
  • If you are older or have certain medical conditions, it is helpful to let your health care provider know you have COVID-19. They may have specific advice for you. 
  • Tell your close contacts, including people who are fully vaccinated, that they may have been exposed to COVID-19. 

How long to stay home 

  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19, stay home until all three of these things are true: 
    • You feel better. Your cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms are better. 
      and 
    • It has been 10 days since you first felt sick. 
      and 
    • You have had no fever for at least 24 hours, without using medicine that lowers fevers. 
  • If you have tested positive for COVID-19 but do not have symptoms, you must still stay home and away from others for 10 days. 
  • Talk to your health care provider if you have questions. 
  • If a lab test shows you do not have COVID-19 but you have symptoms, stay home until your symptoms are better and you do not have a fever. Symptoms of COVID-19 can be like other illnesses. It is important to follow your health care provider's advice before going back to school, work, or other places. 

Going to the doctor 

  • Call ahead before going in to see a health care provider. 
  • If you are older or have other medical conditions, it may be helpful to let your health care provider know you are sick. They may have some specific advice for you. 
  • Some people with COVID-19 have worse symptoms during the second week of illness. 
    • Seek medical care right away if your illness is getting worse (for example, if you have difficulty breathing). Call ahead and tell them your symptoms. 
  • Low oxygen levels can be an early warning sign that people need medical care. For more information, refer to Oxygen Levels, Pulse Oximeters, and COVID-19. 

Click here for a list of frequently asked questions offered by CDC.

SOURCES:
www.health.state.mn.us 
www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/

When am I fully vaccinated? 

In general, people are considered fully vaccinated: ±2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine 

If you don’t meet these requirements, you are NOT fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated. 

Fully vaccinated people can: 

  • Visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing 
  • Visit with unvaccinated people (including children) from a single household who are at low risk for severe COVID-19 disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing 
  • Participate in outdoor activities and recreation without a mask, except in certain crowded settings and venues 
  • Resume domestic travel and refrain from testing before or after travel or self-quarantine after travel 
  • Refrain from testing before leaving the United States for international travel (unless required by the destination) and refrain from self-quarantine after arriving back in the United States 
  • Refrain from testing following a known exposure, if asymptomatic, with some exceptions for specific settings 
  • Refrain from quarantine following a known exposure if asymptomatic 
  • Refrain from routine screening testing if asymptomatic and feasible 

For now, fully vaccinated people should continue to: 

  • Take precautions in indoor public settings like wearing a well-fitted mask 
  • Wear well-fitted masks when visiting indoors with unvaccinated people who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease or who have an unvaccinated household member who is at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease 
  • Wear well-fitted masks when visiting indoors with unvaccinated people from multiple households 
  • Avoid indoor large-sized in-person gatherings 
  • Get tested if experiencing COVID-19 symptoms 
  • Follow guidance issued by individual employers 
  • Follow CDC and health department travel requirements and recommendations 
  • For updated guidelines visit https://bit.ly/3sUsZXu 

Community Resources and Information

This is a list of policy actions and resources for families to keep updated with the prevention, response, and evolution of the current Covid-19 Emergency. It will be updated as more information is gathered.

CLUES Programs and Services:

651-768-0000

Health questions:

651-201-3920 or 1-800-657-3903 | 7 am - 7 pm

Schools and child care questions:

651-297-1304 or 1-800-657-3504 | 7 am - 7 pm

Free Community Testing Sites

Free testing locations offered by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), in partnership with communities.

We strongly encourage you to sign up for an appointment using the registration link listed with each location.

  • Signing up ahead of time helps avoid long lines. People who walk in without an appointment might have to come back later or another day.
  • If you are not able to sign up online, or need an interpreter, call 1-855-612-0677 for assistance.
  • To request an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation or other accessibility needs for testing, please email covidresults@state.mn.us or call 1-855-612-0677 for assistance. Please make requests 2-3 business days before the testing event to ensure time to coordinate accommodations.

Check the MDH page to stay up to date on locations and dates for new community testing sites. To get regular COVID-19 email updates, including announcements of new community testing events, Subscribe to COVID-19 MDH Updates.

Saliva Community Testing Sites
Free saliva testing locations offered by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH).

COVID-19 Test at Home
Free at-home COVID-19 saliva testing for people in select areas.

Find Testing Locations
Map of ongoing testing locations at clinics and hospitals across the state. Call ahead before going to the clinic or hospital to be tested. Not all clinics test people who do not have symptoms.

Information is constantly changing for COVID-19 vaccines.

For information about COVID-19 vaccine safety, and more, visit the MDH page to stay up to date.

To get regular COVID-19 email updates, including announcements of new community testing events, Subscribe to COVID-19 MDH Updates.

 

Governor's Executive Orders

Read all Executive Orders issued by Governor Tim Walz regarding COVID-19.

Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) Updates

Learn more by clicking here.

Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) Updates

Coordinated information for the public

Minnesota Unemployment Insurance

Application process and requirements. Learn more here.

CLUES Canasta Familiar

In response to Covid-19 Emergency Canasta Familiar will distribute FREE non perishable food on Mondays from 3-5pm at the CLUES St. Paul parking lot.

*NOTE: Remember that if you are sick or someone in your family is sick, do not come to Canasta. You can send someone on your behalf to pick up your food. It is important to wear a mask and keep the 6 feet away to help slow the spread of the Coronavirus.
*IMPORTANT: Baskets will be given out on first-come, first-served basis while supplies last. We will be holding a “drive-through” and can only serve people who remain in their vehicles due the risk of in-person contact/transmission. Limit one basket per vehicle.
**Access to the drive-thru Canasta will be via Arcade Street where they will access CLUES parking lot and receive their ER Canasta box through the Adult Day Center side door. We will have a barricade and signs directing participants and doing the best we can to control traffic flow.

List of restaurants and programs giving out food

List of sites with free meals for kids

Hunger Solutions - Food shelves and resources

Loaves and Fishes MN

Minneapolis Public Schools

  • Meals are given from school buses parked in school parking lots; school buildings will remain closed. Meal pickup services begin Tuesday, March 17 and continue Mondays through Fridays from 10 am to 2 pm while schools are closed due to the COVID-19 virus.
  • Link to pick up locations: https://cws.mpls.k12.mn.us/COVID19

Saint Paul Public Schools

White Bear School District free meals/deliveries - Fill out questionnaire at link and follow up with a phone call to Nutrition Services at (651) 407-7515 to request for delivery.

Mounds View School District have set up food banks where families can pick up breakfast/lunch at different schools between 10am-1pm. Locations are in the link.

Internet Essentials program from Comcast: Two months free home access, all public Xfinity Wifi spots open for free.

Spectrum program from Charter: Two months free access for students. Or call 1-844-488-8398.

Minneapolis Public WIFI spots are all free for the time being.

Minnesota Department of Education Guidance and resources regarding closing schools, and what schools and organizations can do to protect the community.

Minnesota’s Safe Learning Plan for the 2020-21 School Year. This plan uses a localized, data-driven approach that allows school districts and charter schools to operate in a learning model that is responsive the prevalence of COVID-19 cases in their community. The plan prioritizes safe learning for all Minnesota students, including requiring school districts and charter schools to give families the option to choose distance learning for their student no matter which learning model their school is implementing. Families can learn more about what the plan means for them here.

The Minnesota Department of Human Services and the Minnesota Department of Education are answering questions related to child care and education, available 7 am –7 pm at 651-297-1304 (Greater Minnesota: 1-800-657-3504).

Minneapolis Public Schools

  • Meals are given from school buses parked in school parking lots; school buildings will remain closed. Meal pickup services begin Tuesday, March 17 and continue Mondays through Fridays from 10 am to 2 pm while schools are closed due to the COVID-19 virus. 
  • Link to pick up locations: https://cws.mpls.k12.mn.us/COVID19

Saint Paul Public Schools

White Bear School District free meals/deliveries - Fill out questionnaire at link and follow up with a phone call to Nutrition Services at (651) 407-7515 to request for delivery. 

Mounds View School District have set up food banks where families can pick up breakfast/lunch at different schools between 10am-1pm. Locations are in the link.

Those whose employment has been affected by COVID-19 may qualify for unemployment. Person needs a valid SS# to apply. CLUES may be able to help you apply. Call 651-379-4243 for more information.

State guidelines are here: www.uimn.org/applicants/needtoknow/news-updates/covid-19.jsp

Workplace tips and employee rights 

If you are still working, your employer is legally required to provide you with a safe workplace, including protections from COVID-19. Click here to learn more about the right to a safe workplace.

If you have lost your job for any reason related to COVID-19, there are paid benefits available to all workers, including:

  • If you work at a small to medium sized company (smaller than 500 employees), and you have personally be quarantined or you are caring for a family member (including a child whose school has been closed), your employer is required to provide you with up to 80 hours of paid sick leave and 10 weeks of paid family and medical leave. Click here for more details.
  • If you have been laid off or lost your job for any reason, even if you are a gig worker or independent contractor, you can apply for Unemployment Insurance. Click here to learn more about Unemployment BenefitsClick here to apply online, or call 651-296-3644 to apply by phone.
  • If you work in Minneapolis or St. Paul, you have the right to Earned Sick and Safe Time pay. Click here for more details
  • If for any reason you do not qualify for any of these benefits, there are many other community resources available. Click here to learn more.

RentHelpMN - Covid-19 Emergency Rental Assistance by Minnesota Department of Housing

The COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance, (RentHelpMN ), works to help renters get the assistance they need to avoid utility shutoff or eviction. The COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance program is administered by Minnesota Housing and the Counties of Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Washington, and the Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul. This program was created to help Minnesotans who have fallen behind on their rent or fear that could happen. If you find yourself in this position, we are here to help. Find out if you qualify and get ready to apply.

COVID-19 Housing Assistance Program (CHAP) by Minnesota Department of Housing

The COVID-19 Housing Assistance Program provides housing assistance payments to help prevent eviction, prevent homelessness, and maintain housing stability for eligible renters and homeowners. Local administrators will review applications from individuals and families requesting assistance, verify eligibility, and process payments for eligible expenses on behalf of households. For more information and apply visit

MN Immigrant Families Fund is a community emergency fund for immigrant families that live in Minnesota that don’t qualify for any state or federal benefits and because COVID-19 are left with few resources available to meet their immediate needs. Apply here.

Minneapolis Gap Funding for Housing and the Forgivable No-Interest Loans for Small Business Program for residentes of the City of Minneapolis. Apply here.  Applications will be accepted 9 a.m. Wednesday, April 22 through noon Monday, April 27.

Saint Paul Bridge Fund is an emergency relief program for families with children and small businesses impacted by the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic for residentes of the city of Saint Paul. Apply here until Sunday, April 19 at 5 p.m.

Scholly Student Relief Fund. $200 in cash assistance to help cover expenses during the Covid-19 crisis. Apply here.

Hennepin County Emergency rental assistance due to COVID-19. Hennepin County residents who have been financially harmed by COVID-19 may qualify for emergency assistance to help with rent and other housing costs. Apply here

CLUES housing counselors are available to support you in preventing foreclosure or eviction during this time. Call 651-379-4243 for more information.

Additional Resources:

Tenant Resource Center - Call 612-302-3180

Homeline - Call 612-728-5767

Most contact centers for public services are closed due to recommendations and executive orders being issued to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Service to any residential customer will not be disconnected until further notice. If you are having difficulty paying your bills, contact your utility company to arrange a payment plan. More info:

Xcel Energy COVID-19 Response

Centerpoint Energy COVID-19 Response

Waste Management COVID-19 Response

The Small Business Administration has guidance and resources available for employers and businesses on COVID-19 response. Learn more here.

Small Business Emergency Loans by Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.

Learn more here.

Workplace tips and employee rights

If you run a small business or are an independent contractor, and your business is impacted by COVID-19:

Guidance on Safely Reopening Minnesota Businesses by MDH

Non-Critical Sector businesses and employers must develop and implement a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan prior to reopening. Businesses must ensure the Plan is evaluated, monitored, executed, and updated under the supervision of a designated Plan Administrator. Employers must ensure the Plan is posted at all of the business’s workplaces in readily accessible locations that will allow for the Plan to be readily reviewed by all workers, as required.

By June 29, Critical Sector businesses are also required to develop and implement a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan

For COVID-19 Preparedness Plan templates, please visit dli.mn.gov/updates.

 

Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs

Public Charge: The U.S. government encourages individuals with symptoms of coronavirus to seek medical treatment or preventive services and states that such treatment or preventive services will not negatively affect future Public Charge analysis for those seeking permanent resident status.

Resources provided in partnership with


Monday-Friday: 8:30am - 5pm
Saturday-Sunday: Closed 
Email: info@clues.org

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MINNEAPOLIS

CareerForce Center
777 East Lake Street
Minneapolis, MN 55407

Tel.: 612-746-3500
Fax: 651-292-0347

ST. PAUL

797 East 7th Street
St. Paul, MN 55106

Tel.: 651-379-4200
Fax: 651-292-0347

AUSTIN

111 Main St. N
Austin, MN, 55912

Tel.: 507-355-2575

WILLMAR

324 3rd Street SW #2
Willmar, MN 56201

Tel.: 320-262-5106

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